Dining with al-Qaeda: Three Decades Exploring the Many Worlds of the Middle East

Dining with al Qaeda Three Decades Exploring the Many Worlds of the Middle East Following in the footsteps of Sir Richard Burton and Lawrence of Arabia Hugh Pope presents his modern day explorations mined from than three decades of the politics religion and aspirations of Mu

  • Title: Dining with al-Qaeda: Three Decades Exploring the Many Worlds of the Middle East
  • Author: Hugh Pope
  • ISBN: 9780312383138
  • Page: 498
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Following in the footsteps of Sir Richard Burton and Lawrence of Arabia, Hugh Pope presents his modern day explorations, mined from than three decades, of the politics, religion, and aspirations of Muslim peoples to show how the Middle East is much than a monolithic Islamic World An Oxford educated scholar of the Middle East and acclaimed former foreign corresFollowing in the footsteps of Sir Richard Burton and Lawrence of Arabia, Hugh Pope presents his modern day explorations, mined from than three decades, of the politics, religion, and aspirations of Muslim peoples to show how the Middle East is much than a monolithic Islamic World An Oxford educated scholar of the Middle East and acclaimed former foreign correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, Pope has lived and worked in two dozen countries throughout the region In eighteen revealing chapters, he delves into the amazingly varied cultures ranging from the south of Sudan to Afghanistan and from Islamabad to Istanbul His probing and often perilous journeys at one point during a meeting with an al Qaeda missionary, Pope is forced to quote Koranic verse to argue against his own murder provide an eye opening look at diverse societies often misportrayed by superficial reporting and why they hate us politics With intimate and personal anecdotes arising out of experiences from war fronts to bazaars to the palaces of kings, Pope weaves a rich narrative that embraces art, food, poetry, customs, and the competing histories of the Middle East Merging the traditions of the classics Balkan Ghosts and From Beirut to Jerusalem, Dining with al Qaeda illuminates an infintely complex part of the world With U.S foreign policy aiming to engage construvtively with Muslim nations, this lyrical book of adventures collects some of the truly important untold stories of our times.

    • Best Read [Hugh Pope] ✓ Dining with al-Qaeda: Three Decades Exploring the Many Worlds of the Middle East || [Philosophy Book] PDF ✓
      498 Hugh Pope
    • thumbnail Title: Best Read [Hugh Pope] ✓ Dining with al-Qaeda: Three Decades Exploring the Many Worlds of the Middle East || [Philosophy Book] PDF ✓
      Posted by:Hugh Pope
      Published :2019-08-03T23:20:01+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Dining with al-Qaeda: Three Decades Exploring the Many Worlds of the Middle East

    1. Hugh Pope Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Dining with al-Qaeda: Three Decades Exploring the Many Worlds of the Middle East book, this is one of the most wanted Hugh Pope author readers around the world.

    2. This book, written by Hugh Pope, is essentially a story/stories about his journey through much of the Middle East as a journalist. I kept that in mind when I checked the book out. Many times, my problem with books similar to this genre is that they tend to be very eurocentric but given the author's background, which he talks about throughout the book, I could tell he tried very hard to not be an ignorant person, to not have any bias. I appreciated that and it made the book worth finishing. I did [...]

    3. In Dining with Al Quaeda,Hugh Pope provides a must-read journalist’s memoir of 30 years of travel through many of the countries still on the front pages today. Much of what he writes seems incredibly timely today. Dining with Al-Qaeda came my way during the reporting of the death of Osama bin Laden.This book educated me more deeply about more different cultures in the mid-East than anything else that I have read. I have seen it compared to Thomas Friedman’s From Beirut to Jerusalem (publishe [...]

    4. What's interesting about this book is the behind-the-scenes look at what a journalist goes through to get a story. Parts of it were a little long on details, though, and I skipped around a fair bit.The chapter entitled 'Mammon in Mecca' was the most interesting one to me, but it was also very depressing. It tracks the systematic loss of historic architecture in Mecca and Medina. It's evidently very convenient for Saudi developers that the state-supported Wahabi view of Islam discourages the pres [...]

    5. I'm not sure what I was expecting besides a little armchair travel but this book wasn't compelling to me. Maybe it's the lack of structure; it's really just a bunch of non-related essays put together. A few interesting bits about the Iraq war and being an international journalist at the Wall Streer Journal. A few complaints: * Like Middle Eastern women, you don't hear anything material about his wife and how he was able to stay married even if as you get discussion about male homosexuality among [...]

    6. While his narrative can be a little disjointed at times, this British reporter has thirty years of living and working in the Middle East to tell us about. He gives an impressive tour of the region, and I've had to reconsider some of my biases in the light of his stories.I haven't given up on those biases. Most of the cultures in this book are revolting to anyone who believes in universal education, rule of law, and the consent of the governed. But Pope shows why they work the way they do, and wh [...]

    7. Written by a British Wall Street Journalist that covered the Middle East for the last 30 years. He covered many of the countries, illuminating the differences and commonalities. He reinforced the need for the US to stop unilaterally supporing Israel. He has written two other books that I would like to read, but his style is a little difficult and many sentences require reading twice for me to get the nuances.

    8. The author showed the differences in culture, assumptions, expectations, and even religion around the Middle East. He was very critical of the new media's assumption that "middle east" and "islam" are homogenous. His disenchantment with being a foreign correspondent was evident throughout the book. It's too bad, because it seemed like he started out with a genuine desire to inform people about the region.

    9. A journalists insight into the complexities of Al-Qaeda-interviewing WTC hijackers prior to bombing--what were the reasons behind the WTC bombings? A complex but interesting read-bringing reader upto date with Pope interviewing Gen Petraeus before withdrawal of troops and Petreus' Thanks to Pope for his inside understanding of the US-Iraq War.

    10. A view of the Middle East by someone who has covered the area as a journalist for thirty years, is fluent in Arabic and Persian, lived in Syria as a young student and has allowed personal experiences to frame his view of our interaction with that part of the world. A must read for those who think we need a new policy in the Middle East.

    11. English interloper decides he's in love with the Middle East, before he visits. Betcha can't guess who the bad guys are. Hint: In case you really can't guess, he states that he has an anti-Israeli bias. Twice.

    12. An interesting persepective from a caucasian European who lives in the middle east long enough to say he is from there. Very interesting perspectives on the Israeli conflict that contradict a lot of mainstream media. Very little flow, as the chapters are disjointed and not in chronological order.

    13. I like that Pope sticks to short stories in his experience that illustrate larger cultural norms of the middle east. It is disjointed, but I appreciate that he leaves it up to the reader to interpret the events and stories.

    14. Really enjoyed the content of this book. It also brought a really interesting perspective on how articles make the newspaper and what kind of impact the reporter and editor's biases have on the paper we read.

    15. Feels a bit slapped together, but Pope is a good journalist who's been everywhere. I especially liked when he trashed his editors at the WSJ for not knowing anything about the region.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *