Some Desperate Glory: The First World War the Poets Knew

Some Desperate Glory The First World War the Poets Knew The story of World War I through the lives and words of its poetsThe hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of what many believed would be the war to end all wars is in And while World War I deva

  • Title: Some Desperate Glory: The First World War the Poets Knew
  • Author: Max Egremont
  • ISBN: 9780374535445
  • Page: 115
  • Format: Paperback
  • The story of World War I, through the lives and words of its poetsThe hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of what many believed would be the war to end all wars is in 2014 And while World War I devastated Europe, it inspired profound poetry words in which the atmosphere and landscape of battle are evoked perhaps vividly than anywhere else The poets many of whom weThe story of World War I, through the lives and words of its poetsThe hundredth anniversary of the outbreak of what many believed would be the war to end all wars is in 2014 And while World War I devastated Europe, it inspired profound poetry words in which the atmosphere and landscape of battle are evoked perhaps vividly than anywhere else The poets many of whom were killed show not only the war s tragedy but also the hopes and disappointments of a generation of men In Some Desperate Glory, the historian and biographer Max Egremont gives us a transfiguring look at the life and work of this assemblage of poets Wilfred Owen with his flaring genius the intense, compassionate Siegfried Sassoon the composer Ivor Gurney Robert Graves, who would later spurn his war poems the nature loving Edward Thomas the glamorous Fabian Socialist Rupert Brooke and the shell shocked Robert Nichols all fought in the war, and their poetry is a bold act of creativity in the face of unprecedented destruction.Some Desperate Glory includes a chronological anthology of the poets works, telling the story of the war not only through the lives of these writers but also through their art This unique volume unites the poetry and the history of the war so often treated separately granting readers the pride, strife, and sorrow of the individual soldier s experience coupled with a panoramic view of the war s toll on an entire nation.

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    2 thoughts on “Some Desperate Glory: The First World War the Poets Knew

    1. Max Egremont Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Some Desperate Glory: The First World War the Poets Knew book, this is one of the most wanted Max Egremont author readers around the world.

    2. "My subject is War, and the pity of War." – Wilfred OwenSome Desperate Glory is about "the feelings and vision of eleven fragile young men who were unlikely warriors" in the First World War – some still well-known like Owen, Sassoon, Edward Thomas, Robert Graves, Rupert Brooke; others mostly forgotten like Isaac Rosenberg, Edmund Blunden, Charles Sorley and Ivor Gurney (somehow the most tragic, which is saying a lot). Among the pile of recent weighty histories of WWI I've accumulated out of [...]

    3. Some Desperate Glory – A wonderful mixture of Poetry & ExplanationDuring the Centenary Year remembering the start of the Great War in 1914 many books are being published in respect of the reasons for war, the first battles of the war and the great soldiers of the war. Many anthologies of the war poets are being brought out as yet another reminder of the war. Max Egremont has joined the canon of books being published about the Great War, but in Some Desperate Glory is different to the other [...]

    4. This was an enlightening book, focusing on eleven of the First World War poets and collectively telling their story year by year, and also adding a chapter on "Aftermath" to discuss the posthumous fame of some of the writers, and also the poems written by people who didn't experience the war.Dispersed through-out is also a collection of the writer's most famous and important poems, making this a half-anthology-half-biography. This was nice, as you were able to link the work with what was happeni [...]

    5. In 1914, the first year of the war, Rupert Brooke wrote, "Now, God be thanked Who has matched us with His hour,/And caught our youth, and awakened us from sleeping," He died later that year on his way to the Dardanelles and is buried in Greece. And in 1918, the last year of the war, Wilfred Owen wrote, "My friend, you would not tell with such high zest/To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est/Pro patria mori." He was killed on the battlefield a few months la [...]

    6. This is a good book, but not a great one. Much of that goodness, moreover, comes from the poets whose work is the heart of this volume. Max Egremont has divided his chapters -- one for each year of the war and one for the aftermath -- into two parts. In the first he provides information on the experiences of each poet that year; in the second he lets the poets speak for themselves, with a selection of poems from the same year. Egremont does not stint on the poetry, with over 100 pages of poetry [...]

    7. Not the best book for beginners, I don't think. Egremont pushes you in quickly, jumping from poet to poet in a couple of paragraphs (sometimes in one paragraph) and throwing in names and terms without clarifying who or what they are (count how many times he calls Rupert Brooke a Fabian socialist without explaining what a Fabian socialist is). I also thought the organization of his writing was a little wonky; 'Break of Day in the Trenches' is in the section for poems written in 1916, but Egremont [...]

    8. Some Desperate Glory written in 2014 celebrates the one hundred year anniversary of the start of WWI by showcasing the work of the British poets who expressed their complex feelings about the war through their poetry. The author divides the book into the years of the war 1914-1918 and gives a brief overview of the war related events of the year along with a selection of the poems written during that year. I found the book to be interesting and poignant as the facts about the battles and trench w [...]

    9. I tried reading "Guns of August," but I couldn't get a sense of emotional immediacy to the War. This book did the trick.

    10. This was an outstanding book. On the surface it’s a collection of poetry from The First World War, but it’s more than that. It integrates the war history, the poet’s biographies, and organizes it in a year-by-year tracking of the poets and their published poems. We learn of their deaths on the battlefield for those that did not make it through the war. We learn of their families back home. We get a glimpse on their critical receptions and lasting reputations. The title of the book comes fr [...]

    11. For the centenary of WWI, Max Egremont has given us a fine survey of WWI poets and poetry. More specifically, it covers British poets who actually participated in the war. "Some Desperate Glory" approaches the topic from several angles: history, biography, and the poetic works themselves. The book is, essentially, arranged in six sections: one for each year of the war as well as one chapter covering the post war years. Each section contains biographical material about the poets, references to th [...]

    12. Anthems for doomed youthsPart group biography of eleven important war poets, part history, part poetic anthology, this does an excellent job of placing the poetry of WW1 within its context. Egremont organises his material by year, so traces both the development of the war and the attitudes it engendered, while also placing the poetry into chronological order.There are some stark facts that this book makes clear: for example, I never knew that more than twice as many British men were killed in WW [...]

    13. While the date of publication reeks of riding the centennial wave Egremont does display an ardent fervor for the subject. At times the author tries a bit too hard to extrapolate what the subjects must have been feeling, but this does not detract from the work on the whole, if anything it just demonstrates the author's love of the subject. Organization of the work and the relatively small number of subjects makes for a nice linear discussion and comparative analysis. This is an excellent work for [...]

    14. This may be better understood if you hail from Great Britain, and the beginning is somewhat of a steep learning curve for those not familiar with the poets being highlighted, but getting to the emotions of this war that certainly didn't end all wars makes it well worth the read. If you've read other histories of WWI then this will be an enjoyable addition, especially seeing the war through the eyes of poets, and realizing that war poets were quite the rage back then. I loved reading about the wa [...]

    15. Interesting structure, as Egremont weaves in the doings of a number of British soldier-poets during the war, year by year; at the end of each chapter, a selection of poems published (or maybe written) during that year. Alas, for me there were a couple of things that tripped me up. One, there are so many poets that I never really got into the narratives of their lives. And two, I didn't really enjoy the poems much, at least not until the postwar material.In fairness, the book's well-written and t [...]

    16. As indicated by his masterful biography of Siegfried Sassoon, Max Egremont has an enviable grasp of First World War poetry This collection and critical analysis of 11 poets of the First World War is magnificent Arranged chronologically and supported by specimen poems, the book presents an overview of the poetry created during the First World War and its aftermath

    17. Did a great job of getting many different view points and bringing the reader through the evolution of the literary culture. I found his writing style a bit bizarre and sometime confusing to follow as I am not aware of all the poets from that time. I found it took away from the read. The chosen poems were great.

    18. I have mixed feelings about this book. The poetry was amazing, powerful, wrenching, heartbreaking stuff. But the sections between the poems were not as good. They were informative, but unfocused enough that I had a lot of trouble keeping everyone straight. It did make me want to learn more.

    19. less would have been more in my opinion. I struggled to keep track of the lives of all the poets, having to constantly refer back to previous sections to remind myself of their individual histories.I did however like the chronological chapter structure, and enjoyed the choice of poems.

    20. Good easy read survey of the subject. Would have liked a bit more on the postwar but otherwise pretty solid.

    21. Interesting in that all the information has been gathered together, but somewhat lengthy. I would have liked an 80:20 ratio of poetry:prose instead of the reverse.

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