African Tales: Folklore of the Central African Republic

African Tales Folklore of the Central African Republic Tales from the oral tradition of the Madija and Banda tribes collected from village storytellers of the Central African Republic and translated by Polly Strong

  • Title: African Tales: Folklore of the Central African Republic
  • Author: Rodney Wimer Polly Strong
  • ISBN: 9781878893147
  • Page: 302
  • Format: Paperback
  • Tales from the oral tradition of the Madija and Banda tribes, collected from village storytellers of the Central African Republic and translated by Polly Strong.

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      Posted by:Rodney Wimer Polly Strong
      Published :2019-012-27T00:35:29+00:00

    2 thoughts on “African Tales: Folklore of the Central African Republic

    1. Rodney Wimer Polly Strong Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the African Tales: Folklore of the Central African Republic book, this is one of the most wanted Rodney Wimer Polly Strong author readers around the world.

    2. Oh man, this is one of those classic super-offensive missionary-style "I first came to Africa 26 years ago. I came to give but found I was given to" deals. You know those books! Someone writes down literal word-for-word translations of a very specific storyteller's interpretation of some very specifically localized folk tales, and then generalizes in the introduction how "the Africans" (#AfricaIsACountry) think, feel, and understand the world. The translation are particularly bad in this volume: [...]

    3. I read Why Monkeys Live in Trees and Other Stories from Benin immediately before this, so the comparison in the stories and the different focus of the compilers was interesting. "Monkeys" focused more on "this is why things are this way" kind of stories, while African Tales was a little of that, but mostly tales of the trickster figure Tere. It's culturally very interesting to see how those tales coincide with folk tales in other parts of the world, and of course, how they differ. I love that st [...]

    4. This book was very interesting. I enjoyed the stories themselves but found it hard to read at times. The main problem I had was sentence structure and how it seemed like a direct/literal translation, with little thought to the meaning of the words themselves. There was a lack of sentence variation, everything was extremely matter of fact. It was so matter of fact that I had to look at the end of the story sometimes to see what the moral/lesson was supposed to teach me. That being said I did enjo [...]

    5. This book is a collection of traditional stories that attempt to explain why the world is the way it is, especially why certain animals don't like each other. The main "moral" I found is that your actions are always remembered, and that relationships are based on histories of how people have treated each other. Some of them were, however, very confusing - definitely a different way of seeing the world!

    6. I don't know how unique these tales are to the Central African Republic, but I enjoyed this collection of stories of Tere the Trickster and origins of adversarial relationships between animals. The moral at the end of each tale reminds me of Aesop's Fables. My favorite story is "Ten Orphans."

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