Waiting for an Army to Die: The Tragedy of Agent Orange

Waiting for an Army to Die The Tragedy of Agent Orange Telling a tragic and important story Vietnam War veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange chronicle their discovery of the cause of serious illnesses within their ranks and birth defects among their

  • Title: Waiting for an Army to Die: The Tragedy of Agent Orange
  • Author: Fred A. Wilcox
  • ISBN: 9780932020680
  • Page: 183
  • Format: Paperback
  • Telling a tragic and important story, Vietnam War veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange chronicle their discovery of the cause of serious illnesses within their ranks and birth defects among their children, as well as their long battle with a government that refused to listen to their complaints.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Waiting for an Army to Die: The Tragedy of Agent Orange | by ✓ Fred A. Wilcox
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      Posted by:Fred A. Wilcox
      Published :2019-08-26T18:18:23+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Waiting for an Army to Die: The Tragedy of Agent Orange

    1. Fred A. Wilcox Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Waiting for an Army to Die: The Tragedy of Agent Orange book, this is one of the most wanted Fred A. Wilcox author readers around the world.

    2. I read this book as a teenager. It made me so sad. My father was in Vietnam, as was the fathers of so many people.This book impacted me greatly. I feel, even to this day, that our goverment really has no respect for our military. They certainly didn't then and I am not sure that they do at this time either.When I see news shows about what happens with veterans of more recent wars, I think of this book and wonder if they are really treated any better?It makes me angry to think how these men were [...]

    3. Through a series of interviews and perspectives the author tells about those exposed to Agent Orange and the effects it has had on their lives. The book was written in 1982 at a time when there was not universal recognition that Agent Orange was responsible for thousands of Vietnam veterans developing wasting neuromuscular and liver diseases and cancers as well as having stillborn infants or children with multiple birth defects. Indeed for years the government and the chemical companies that man [...]

    4. This book was about Vietnam war veterans who were exposed to the herbicide nicknamed Agent Orange. It was a chemical used to destroy vegetation exposing the enemy's position. Though, soldiers exposed to it reported very odd medical and health issues normally found in very old people. These soldiers were in their early twenties. They were all told that they would not be hurt and that Agent Orange was non-toxic. This book is about their story of these such symptoms including horrible birth defects [...]

    5. I wish I had read this book earlier. I got this copy from my friend Dick Hughes whom I visited at his New York City office last Saturday. Actually I have read the first four chapters and I only did so while I was on the plane flying from DC to LA. It's a sad but must read book which made me cried as I thought about those American soldiers and Vietnamese soldiers of both sides, including my mother as an NLF combatant who fought in 67-69 in Quang Tri Province, who have suffered from the effects of [...]

    6. Nations that take pride in democracy all over the world have often failed to be grateful to their soldiers. The liberty to talk like intellectuals comes at the cost of the man who picks up the gun and gives up on his so called basic needs. The book gives us gripping, behind-the-scenes, true account of the grief and injustice that the american veteran and his offspring were subject to. It's a narrative of how the world's oldest democracy not only failed to serve but in a way poisoned its own sold [...]

    7. After volunteering with children and adult affected by Agent Orange two years ago in Vietnam. Everyone as the right to have their stories told. I truly recommend this book to anyone. Fred A. Wilcox personalizes the tragedy of Agent Orange by telling the individual stories of those who suffered from the side effects of Agent Orange and the terrible treatment they received.

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