Walt and the Promise of Progress City

Walt and the Promise of Progress City Walt Disney s vision for a city of tomorrow EPCOT would be a way for American corporations to show how technology creative thinking and hard work could change the world He saw this project as a wa

  • Title: Walt and the Promise of Progress City
  • Author: Sam Gennawey
  • ISBN: 9780615540245
  • Page: 335
  • Format: Paperback
  • Walt Disney s vision for a city of tomorrow, EPCOT, would be a way for American corporations to show how technology, creative thinking, and hard work could change the world He saw this project as a way to influence the public s expectations about city life, in the same way his earlier work had redefined what it meant to watch an animated film or visit an amusement park WWalt Disney s vision for a city of tomorrow, EPCOT, would be a way for American corporations to show how technology, creative thinking, and hard work could change the world He saw this project as a way to influence the public s expectations about city life, in the same way his earlier work had redefined what it meant to watch an animated film or visit an amusement park Walt and the Promise of Progress City is a personal journey that explores the process through which meaningful and functional spaces have been created by Walt Disney and his artists as well as how guests understand and experience those spaces.

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      Published :2019-02-04T02:19:45+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Walt and the Promise of Progress City

    1. Sam Gennawey Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Walt and the Promise of Progress City book, this is one of the most wanted Sam Gennawey author readers around the world.

    2. The title of this book is somewhat misleading, it's not until three-quarters of the way through that it really begins to discuss the original vision of EPCOT. Its subject is really the entirety of Walt's endeavors in urban planning - be they theme parks, backyard railroads, or entire cities. The subject matter has been meticulously researched and the bibliography is a veritable who's who of modern Disney historians. The author goes to great lengths to cite his sources, almost to a fault; often t [...]

    3. Gennaway shows convincingly how Walt (the man, differentiated from Disney, his company) accumulated insight, knowledge, and pragmatic wisdom at every stage of his life, as he designed but could not complete his city of the future. Along the way we see - from various vantage points - how much influence Walt had on our lives and our expectations. Even those familiar with Walt's biography and career will learn much from this interesting and well-formed book.

    4. Often I have wondered what the Walt Disney World Resort would have looked like if Walt Disney had lived to see his last dream come to completion. I am sure that many of you have wondered the same thing. Walt Disney’s hopes for his Florida property were for so much more than a theme park; after all he did not do sequels. The Walt Disney World Resort we have today is more than a clone of the Disneyland that opened in 1955 due to lessons learned from the California park, but it is still only a sh [...]

    5. I have to be honestI thought I was going to be a bit biased when it came to this book.You see, I have been reading Sam's work online for the past few years, both on his own website, SamLand, and on MiceChat. I've enjoyed pretty much everything he's written about, and his writing style in general. Sam has always taken a very scholarly approach to every subject pertaining to Disney, and really helped me (and others) understand certain aspects of the company.This book is more of the same, and I dar [...]

    6. I enjoyed this book a lot more than I expected to. Having read a fair amount about Disney's plans for EPCOT and the "Florida Project" ("Walt Disney and the Quest for Community", "Project Future", and others), I was pleasantly surprised at how much new and thought-provoking material was in this book. The author's writing style is very reader-friendly, even when he addressed fairly technical and stuff content.This book leads the reader through a history of various projects that Walt Disney (and th [...]

    7. Thorough read!Very well researched. A TON of information about Disney as well as basic urban planning itself. A very dry read at times, as the definitions and explanations can be mind numbing. A. Very interesting account of Walt's actual plans for Epcot. Highly recommended!!

    8. Call me Art Vandelay because after reading this I want to be an architect or urban planner. Reading this in conjunction with the two Disneyland TV shows by Walt Disney makes for a very interesting read about America's cities and our reliance on cars.

    9. So ultimately Walt and the Promise of Progress City was disappointing to me. If the author reads this, please just discard my review, don't be offended or anything, you wrote a very well written book on city planning and what Progress City/EPCOT would have been from that aspect. It's just not what I wanted or was looking for, so maybe it was my own expectations of the book that failed, rather than what I actually ended up reading.What I wanted, was a fun look into the EPCOT that Walt envisioned, [...]

    10. A well-researched, lovingly organized and intimate insider's look at Walt's vision for an ideal community, this book should be of interest to fans of urban design, utopian futrism and Disney.While most people know that Walt intended Disneyworld to be a working city, few have bothered to reveal the thinking behind Walt's vision. Gennawey reveals Walt's EPCOT not to be a Westworld-like fantasy, but a reaction against urban sprawl and freeway gridlock. Here is a vision of the future meant to captur [...]

    11. An interesting look at what makes the Disney theme parks such inviting and enjoyable places to be, and the story of Walt Disney's greatest dream that never fully came to fruition. Sam Gennaway, a fan of Disney history and an urban planner, introduces readers to concepts from his line of work that set the parks apart from many other places, and explains how Walt's fascination with theories on how to solve the problems of our cities led him to start working on a city of his own. The book gets off [...]

    12. "Walt and the Promise of Progress City" is an interesting chronology of Walt Disney's building projects with a mind toward the key influences in Walt's interests and life that led to EPCOT. While it is not the critique of EPCOT and Walt's vision from an urban planning and architectural point of view that I had hoped (it is entirely too sympathetic to be even close to a critique), it is an interesting book nonetheless. Gennaway does bring in some references to architectural and urban planning tre [...]

    13. An amazing book detailing Walt Disney's interest in urban design. Quotes material from rare books (such as vinyl leaves), and is a valuable read in that regard. Lots of insight on Disney's design values. There is so much wind up, however, that once I got to to central premise of the book (what would the Experimental Prototype Community Of Tomorrow have looked liked had it been built?) I was pretty much worn out

    14. The part about Disney's vision for a progressive, indoor Jetsons city was very engrossing, but despite the title of the book, this wasn't really discussed until the last 100 pages or so. The rest of the book was an interesting, if biased, history of the various Disney buildings and theme parks, and an homage to a revolutionary (but, in my opinion, a bit crazy) thinker, written by someone who probably has a lot of Disneyland/World buttons.

    15. This book explores the ideas and history that led Walt Disney to imagine his Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow. While the book does drift into the realms of academia on occasion, it does lead up to the climatic narration of what EPCOT would have been like. The tone is optimistic and inquisitive, not cynical - like Walt himself. This is required reading for Disneyphiles!

    16. Confusing changes between reality (what was built) and what was proposed (EPCOT) made it less enjoyable than expected. That, and it felt a little too over the top like a non-stop praise book for Walt Disney and his colleagues. Likely just needed more editing.

    17. I like urban planning, so I enjoyed the book. Gennawey explains u.p. theories, so it's a good intro too. A Disney Geek might be bored with the history of Disney, as the book doesn't offer anything bee.

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